Crisis Management: Don’t Close the Door on Your Organization’s Fire

One of my friends when I was growing up in the countryside of Indiana was a boy named Billy, who lived a few houses down the street. Billy was a nice kid but not the sharpest tool in the shed when it came to common sense.

We were both around ten years old when “the incident” occurred: While playing with matches in his bedroom, Billy set the window curtains on fire. He tried putting the fire out, but the flames quickly spread. Billy was so overwhelmed by the situation that he walked out of his room, closed the door and started watching TV in the living room. Really, that’s exactly what he did.

For a few minutes, he didn’t have to deal with the awful reality of what he had done, and he was able to go about life as usual. 

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However, it wasn’t long before the entire house was engulfed in flames. Fortunately he and his family escaped, but the house burned to the ground. I still remember hearing the sirens and watching flames shoot out of their house as firemen tried in vain to save it.

Now I understand why my mother encouraged me to make some new friends.

Billy never talked much about “the incident,” so I can’t say for sure what was going through his mind. But I suspect when the fire started in his bedroom, he was afraid he’d get in trouble for playing with matches and thought he could handle it. After all, it was just a little flame at the end of a match—at least, at first. That was MISTAKE #1.

When he realized he couldn’t put the fire out, Billy apparently became so overwhelmed with what he’d done that he convinced himself he could just close the door on the fire and it would magically go away. That was MISTAKE #2.

When I tell this story in my crisis communications seminar, people are amazed at such irresponsible behavior, and rightfully so. Billy should have known better—a raging fire doesn’t extinguish itself by shutting the door on it.

Yet, many organizations with intelligent, well-educated leaders often take the same approach to dealing with a crisis in their organization.

Rather than face reality, they try to ignore the crisis or put a lid on it.

More often than not, the crisis grows and becomes consuming, and in the process devours time and resources. Sometimes the organization’s reputation is severely harmed, and out of the ashes investigations suddenly appear.

It’s not unusual for negative publicity and intense scrutiny from the outside, which often occur during a crisis, to be accompanied by a creeping sense of panic over loss of control of the situation and concern about what might happen next.

Sometimes a crisis is created by an opposing special-interest group that wants to stir up trouble and put the organization on the defensive. With the advantage of surprise, the group then continues to pour kerosene on the fire it has set. If the organization is caught off guard, it may be forced to divert valuable resources to fight the fire.

More times than not the result is a siege mentality and short-term focus among senior management, which only makes the situation worse.

Facing reality and engaging the crisis in its early stages will make the situation more manageable and less damaging.

When a crisis strikes, those charged with managing communications should have three primary objectives:

  1. Maintain control of the message
  2. Minimize damage
  3. Achieve accurate and balanced coverage through the news media and Internet

One of the best ways to help maintain control and minimize damage when a crisis strikes is to have a flexible crisis management plan in place.

The plan should:

  • Contemplate the types of crises that could occur
  • Set forth policies to deal with them
  • Identify all audiences and the best ways to communicate with them
  • Have a pre-selected crisis management team in place
  • Establish a system for communicating accurate information quickly and effectively

The only thing worse than not having a crisis plan is having one that is not communicated, reviewed or tested by those who ultimately will have to implement it.

photo credit: nrg_crisis Aglow via photopin (license)

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Ad Agencies: What Publicity Opportunities Are You Missing for the New Year?

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My first job in public relations was with an international nonprofit organization. I was blessed to have a terrific mentor—a former newspaper editor—who took me under his wing and really taught me how to write for reporters, evaluate news like they do and develop effective working with them.

We had a small staff and typically were overwhelmed with requests and things to do; frequently, we were putting out fires. We did very little actual media pitching, except for some of the large events we held.

At the time, my idea of media relations was when the phone rang we answered it, and if it was a reporter calling we did our best to be helpful.

When I went to work for a large PR firm, I was immediately introduced to the concept of generating publicity for our clients by coming up with ideas and angles for what would hopefully be positive coverage.

And, by the way, the clients expected ongoing coverage, so we sometimes had to be creative in coming up with story ideas and new angles. 

As you think about publicity opportunities for 2018, the following are some topics to keep your agency in the news:

  • Commentary about marketing trends/current issues
  • Sponsorships
  • Community involvement
  • Events
  • New clients, employees, awards, publications
  • New services, office expansion, etc.
  • Mentoring programs
  • Pro bono work
  • Guest columns in the local newspaper or business journal
  • Articles in relevant industry publications
  • Human interest stories about employees or clients (unusual hobbies, their community involvement, humanitarian work, etc.)

To expand on that last point about human interest stories, one of my favorites was an article our local paper ran about a real estate agent in the Nashville area who gives a portion of his commission for every house sold to sponsor impoverished children in developing countries. At the time the story was published, he was supporting 53 children in 19 countries.

Sometimes feature stories like this get overlooked internally, but they have great potential to build a brand.

Not only did this story generate positive publicity for the real estate agent, but it also was a boost for his company’s image. If I were looking to buy or sell a house, he’s someone I’d like to do business with because he’s a generous person who gives back to those less fortunate.

Goodwill like this is hard to quantify, but it makes a lasting impression in a way that no other marketing tool can replicate.

photo credit: KorneelPhotography 2018 via photopin (license)

Storytelling Is a Powerful Tool for Ad Agency PR

Several months ago, I was part of a marketing team that helped a client cast a vision for “what could be” if granted a highly sought-after lease of 50+ acres of city-owned land to expansion its operations. Millions of dollars were at stake.

Over a period of several months, we developed a communications strategy and materials–including a powerful video–which told the client’s story in a way designed to elicit an emotional response and a strong sense of community, resulting in widespread support for the project.

Our strategy was to focus on telling rather than selling. Last month the city granted our client the lease, in large part because of our ability to articulate the vision and the many benefits the community would gain as the vision became reality.

As an article in Forbes points out, “In today’s age of brand experience, it seems that emotional engagement is proving to be more and more critical to achieving winning results, and effective storytelling is at the heart of this movement.”

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Storytelling is certainly at the heart of Kickstarter, the world’s largest funding platform for creative projects. According to the company’s website, more than 10 million people, from every continent on earth, have backed a Kickstarter project. Artists, filmmakers, designers, developers and creators are required to tell their stories through a video that explains what they are doing and why it matters.

“Today, one of the biggest corporate buzzwords is ‘storytelling.’ Marketers are obsessed with storytelling,” writes Shane Snow, chief content officer at Contently, a New York company that connects freelance journalists with corporate assignments.

In an opinion article on HubSpot, he describes storytelling as “a timeless skill” and claims, “As the majority of corporations start thinking of themselves as publishers, the defining characteristic among the successful ones will be the ability to not just spew content, but to craft compelling stories.”

I think he’s right. When it comes to engaging target audiences, building brand loyalty and differentiating an organization from competitors, nothing beats the ability to artfully tell a story.

You may forget facts and statistics, but a good story stays with you.

A memorable story will differentiate your agency from the competition, just as finding compelling stories about your clients will help them position their organizations and stand out from the crowd.

The reason storytelling is so powerful is because it enables us to uniquely connect with specific audiences.

When it comes to new business for agencies, storytelling can make or break a deal. It can make you memorable or easy to forget.

Want to win more new business? Take an honest look at how well your agency is engaging prospects with compelling stories vs. selling your services and experience.

photo credit: Lester Public Library World Storytelling Day via photopin (license)

Crisis Management, NFL Style

Everywhere you look these days the NFL is dominating conversations, but not for the usual reasons. The sight of players kneeling during the national anthem has become the focal point of games, rather than the games themselves. A few teams have tried to avoid the controversy altogether by remaining in their locker rooms until after the anthem.
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At first, only a handful of players chose to kneel rather than stand for our flag and anthem. As of last week, however, the number of kneeling players exceeded 200, representing nearly a quarter of the league. In London, the same players who took a knee for the anthem stood when “God Save the Queen” was played.

Since then, scores of fans have expressed outrage, professional football ratings have dropped, one sponsor has pulled ads and DirecTV has started allowing some refunds for viewers upset with the anthem protests.

Ironically the flag and national anthem—which traditionally have united us as Americans—are now dividing us, thanks to political correctness running amok at the NFL.

Whether its leadership realizes it or not, the NFL is in a crisis mode, and so far its response has been less than stellar. In fact, the league is exhibiting symptoms of a seize mentality, which can be downright toxic in a crisis.

A recent poll found that nearly two-thirds of Americans believe players should stand and be respectful during the anthem, yet the NFL continues to defy its fans. They also are ignoring their own games operations manual, which states: “The National Anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the National Anthem. During the National Anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking.”NFL Photo 3 Flag 6343256929_547261ae8b.jpgIgnoring the wishes of people who finance your business is not a winning strategy, nor is selectively enforcing rules and basically telling your customers that you don’t care what they think or how much they are offended them by your actions.

With the way things are going, I can’t help but wonder how long it will be until those of us who stand for the national anthem are accused of being racists and opposing social justice.

The NFL is big, really big – but not as big as Americans’ love of country and respect for our flag, military and police. The NFL cannot win by putting fans in the place whey must choose between loyalty to country or to professional football.

Taya Kyle said it well in an open letter to the NFL: “Your desire to focus on division and anger has shattered what many people loved most about the sport. Football was really a metaphor for our ideal world — different backgrounds, talents, political beliefs and histories as one big team with one big goal — to do well, to win, TOGETHER. You are asking us to abandon what we loved about togetherness and make choices of division.”

Some of the players and pundits now claim the protests are misunderstood and not intended to show disrespect to America. So why are they kneeling? The reasons range from protesting President Trump to social injustice to racism to police brutality.

Which raises an interesting question: Are the NFL players, coaches and owners in agreement about what they are protesting?

Colin Kaepernick, who started all this, has been very clear about his reasons for kneeling during the anthem: “I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color.”

Contrary to what Mr. Kaepernick seems to think, most Americans are not racists. Our justice system is not perfect—nor will it ever be—but we are not a national of oppressors. If that were the case, why would so many people from all over the world want to come here?

The NFL owes us an explanation about what, exactly, has to change to make these protestors want to stand up for their country again. What is the end game? We really don’t know because all we are getting is mixed messages from teams and players, with an NFL unity ad airing in the midst of some of the most divisive actions imaginable.

What we do know is that allowing players to disrespect our country sets a very poor example for young people, and basically communicates to them that it’s okay to trash our flag and anthem, as well as the military and police who protect us.

For me, and I suspect millions of others, the NFL will never again have the same appeal. I started my boycott of NFL games last week because, as one season ticket fan put it, “I’m just sick of the whole thing.” A lot of us can relate to that sentiment.

The problems of social injustice and racism are not going to be solved by players kneeling during the national anthem. While we should always strive to improve in those areas, as a Christian I believe that only Jesus can change hearts in a way that causes prejudiced people to act justly and love others unconditionally.

Eric Reid, a teammate of Colin Kaepernick, said his faith “moved me to take action,” and that he and Mr. Kaepernick decided to kneel to “make a more powerful and positive impact on the social justice movement.” He went on the lament in a New York Times article, “It baffles me that our protest is still being misconstrued as disrespectful to the country, flag and military personnel.”

Mr. Reid, if you really want to do something positive that won’t be misconstrued, I have a suggestion for you and the other NFL players, coaches and owners of faith: After the anthem is played, gather together to join hands, drop to both knees and say a brief prayer for God to unify our nation. That could be the start of something very powerful indeed.

photo credit: furanda Football via photopin (license)

photo credit: NYCMarines New York Jets Military Appreciation Ceremony, 2011 via photopin (license)

 

 

 

 

How Ad Agency PR Can Generate New Business

Having worked in corporation communications, journalism and for advertising & PR agencies in Chicago and Nashville, I’ve had the opportunity to see public relations in action from a variety of perspectives. It’s been my experience that a lot of agencies like to use public relations tactics to create awareness, but few use PR as a strategic tool for new business.

Helping agencies harness the power of PR and use it strategically for new business has been an interest of mine for several years. I’ve shared my thoughts in a variety of forums about ways in which ad agencies can develop a PR plan that not only generates awareness, but also compliments their new business initiatives and enhances new business opportunities.

Several months ago, I was honored when a representative from HubSpot contacted me to ask if I would be interested in being part of the company’s Agency Expert Webinar Series.

HubSpot is a developer and marketer of software products for inbound marketing and sales, with 34,000 customers in 90 countries and 3,400 agency partners.

How to Craft an Agency PR Plan That Will Drive New Biz SS

 My September 13 webinar discussed the building blocks of creating a performance-based public relations plan for an agency. It also explained how the strategic use of PR can enhance awareness and credibility; distinguish an agency from its competitors; and make it easier for decision makers to find agencies that have expertise in the area they are seeking.

Here’s the link to my session about “How to Craft an Agency PR Plan that Will Drive New Business.” I appreciate HubSpot giving me the opportunity to be part of this series.

5 Tips for Creating an Effective Ad Agency Video for New Business

This guest post is by Senior Content Developer Helen Clark. She has been an avid blogger for 10 years, with special interests in videography and creative editing. Helen has contributed articles and blogs to top videography and editing-related sites. She can be reached at hc061685@gmail.com.

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The initial wave of marketing is of immense importance for a new business. In order to keep the business running, it is necessary that you have new projects coming in, and that won’t be possible unless you put yourself on the map.

However, a potential problem with making your first video ad might be funding. When a business is young, there are usually no significant funds that can be directed this way. This is why you should learn about what makes a video effective, so you can cost-effectively achieve the desired effect.

Make First Seconds Really Count

The first few seconds will either make your viewers interested in what you have to say or drive them from your brand. An average viewer won’t waste much time watching a video of an unfamiliar brand, so be sure to make the beginning of your video effective by turning to controversy or humor, for example.

Accent the Highlights of Your Brand

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In order to attract a bigger audience, you need to focus on strengthening your brand name. A video like this needs to emphasize what your brand stands for and what your business is about. Therefore, make sure to clarify this and have in mind that your logo needs to be incorporated as well.

Keep Your Video Brief

As previously mentioned, an average viewer won’t be very enthusiastic to watch a couple of minutes of an advertising video. You should set an upper limit – your video shouldn’t be longer than thirty seconds. So, no matter what kind of marketing method you’re trying to apply, keeping it brief needs to be your priority.

Mind the Language

Not only does the length of your video need to be short, but you should also make sure that what you have to say is to the point. Every word you plan on incorporating in your video needs to be clear so that there is no room for misunderstandings – after all, you only have up to thirty seconds to say what you want.

You need to be very careful when it comes to your choice of vocabulary. Most new businesses sound pretentious in their first ads, and this is because of one reason – they use complicated words for the purpose of proving themselves and their expertise. So, the language you use needs to be transparently simple, because you have bigger chances of landing customers if you show your office as a down-to-earth team made up of attentive professionals.

Wrap Up Your Video Advertisement

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Perhaps filming the actual footage may not be a problem — even amateur videos have their charm. However, you must not allow your agency to be perceived as amateurish. The success of your first ads, and the future of you agency in this case, will depend on your video-editing skills.

If this is not something you have experience with, my suggestion is not to lose any time or effort trying to edit your video by yourself. As a businessperson, I’m sure you’re aware of how important packaging is — which is why you should go with someone who provides professional video editing services like the Video Caddy company. 

This definitely isn’t a risk you should take.

With all of this in mind, I think you’re ready to make your first ad. Make sure to develop a concept first and come up with a strategy so that you don’t waste any time on this project. After all — you have an agency to develop.

 

 

 

HubSpot Webinar Will Focus on Ad Agency PR Planning for New Business

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On Wednesday, September 13 at 10 a.m. CT/11 a.m. ET, I’ll be presenting a webinar titled, “How to Craft an Agency PR Plan that Drives New Business” as part of HubSpot’s 2017 Agency Expert Webinar Series.

My session will include an overview of:

  • Why PR is important to an agency’s new business efforts
  • Seven significant PR trends
  • Ten foundational principles for working with the news media and bloggers

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I’ll also cover:

  • The quickest way to increase awareness and gain credibility
  • How to get the attention of decision makers
  • The most important aspects of a successful agency PR plan
  • Key questions to ask when putting together your plan
  • What your plan should include
  • Nine PR tools for new business that are either free or very cost effective
  • Three strategies for using PR to boost new business development

Use this link to register: https://offers.hubspot.com/agency-expert-webinar-series